Text 1 Feb One difference now…

… is that kids do not need to enter their own town, get deep in the streets, seize space, create DIY media on the skin of the city, and actually rub elbows with people.

Ensminger, D. A., 2011. Visual Vitriol: The Street Art and Subcultures of the Punk and Hardcore Generation. Mississippi: University Press of Mississippi. (p.291)

Text 1 Feb "Playing with themselves in public"

In punk and post-punk… girls have begun playing with themselves in public: parodying the conventional iconography of fallen womanhood - the vamp, the tart, the slut, the waif, the sadistic maitresse, the victim-in-bondage. These girls interrupt the image-flow. They play back images of women as icons, women as the Furies of classical mythology. They make the s-m matrix strange. They skirt round the voyeurism issue, flirt with masculine curiosity but refuse to submit to the masterful gaze.

Hebdige, D., 1989. Hiding in the light: On images and things. New York: Routledge. (p. 28)

Text 1 Feb 1 note Day-Glo

Fluorescence holds nothing back for later - like punk, its mode is the mode of anti-interiority, denial of romantic self, a cheap trick, a cheap trip without innerness, an upfront, slap in the face of public taste… Day-Glo can take us back into the first moments of Punk’s immediacy, its shock and exhileration - the heretical idea of living historically instead of at the behest of the needs of capital accumulation. No past, no future, no capital, no mortgage payments.

Leslie, E., Watson, B., The Punk Paper: A Dialogue. [online] Available at: <http://www.militantesthetix.co.uk/punk/Punkcomb.html> [Accessed 19 January 2013 ].

Text 1 Feb The Zombie Archetype

Punk artists may employ the zombie archetype to figuratively show how punks represent the abject, the unwanted, and marginalised in society; inversely, they may also represent a way for punks to project their own fantasies of “getting rid” of people in their own lives.

Ensminger, D. A., 2011. Visual Vitriol: The Street Art and Subcultures of the Punk and Hardcore Generation. Mississippi: University Press of Mississippi. (p.131)

Text 1 Feb Skateboarding

…skateboarding is in direct tension with the massively commditised, bureaucratised, X-sports-generated concept of the game, much in the same way that Green Day is a corporate punk model, although traces of rebellion remain latent in each. This aspect has become part of the lore of skateboarding as it actively borrows from street art culture and punk, with their emphasis on reclaiming public space, freedom and open expression, individualism and rebellion.

Ensminger, D. A., 2011. Visual Vitriol: The Street Art and Subcultures of the Punk and Hardcore Generation. Mississippi: University Press of Mississippi. (p.108)

Text 1 Feb Chester Carlson

… punk may have a sympathetic and symbolic relationship to the founder of modern xerography, Chester Carlson, the creator of the process, who grew up in dire poverty with an invalid father and a mother who died when he was a teenager.

… He… purchased buildings in New York City and Washington and integrated them, provided money to the United Negro College Fund and black colleges, and even provided the bulk of funding for the Centre for the Study of Democratic Institutions… He also supported schools, relief agencies, and pacifist organisations.

… The democratic potential of the Xerox machine, or xerography itself, can thus be seen as an extension of the creator’s desire to see a more diverse, integrated, and participatory American culture.

Ensminger, D. A., 2011. Visual Vitriol: The Street Art and Subcultures of the Punk and Hardcore Generation. Mississippi: University Press of Mississippi. (p.52)

Text 1 Feb 1 note "Fans raid mass culture"

Undaunted by traditional conceptions of literacy and intellectual property, fans raid mass culture, claiming its materials for their own use, reworking them as the basis for their own cultural creations and social interactions.

Jenkins, H., 1992. Textual Poachers: Television Fans and Participatory Culture. New York: Routeledge, Chapman, and Hall. (p. 18)

Photo 1 Feb 13 notes 
"In the entire history of rock and roll, no one has ever done this," Chantry insists about the elevated middle finger on a 1995 Makers LP/CD for Estrus Records. "How come?" The acknowledgements on the back, featuring several styles of old press type (as one ran out, Chantry filled in with another), conclude with a reference to "all the clubs that ripped us off and/or kicked us out."

Lasky, J., Jacobs, K., 2001. Some People Can’t Surf: The Graphic Design of Art Chantry. San Francisco: Chronicle Books. (p. 100)
Album art reference: Chantry, A., 1995. The Makers. [Cover art]

"In the entire history of rock and roll, no one has ever done this," Chantry insists about the elevated middle finger on a 1995 Makers LP/CD for Estrus Records. "How come?" The acknowledgements on the back, featuring several styles of old press type (as one ran out, Chantry filled in with another), conclude with a reference to "all the clubs that ripped us off and/or kicked us out."

Lasky, J., Jacobs, K., 2001. Some People Can’t Surf: The Graphic Design of Art Chantry. San Francisco: Chronicle Books. (p. 100)

Album art reference: Chantry, A., 1995. The Makers. [Cover art]

Text 1 Feb 5 notes An Ominous Blow to the Underground

Chantry blames another part of the counterculture’s demise on Seattle’s transformation into a high-tech capital attracting straightlaced entrepreneurs. When, in 1999, software company Adobe’s regional headquarters moved into a large complex in the liberal neighbourhood of Fremont, the new building signaled yet one more triumph of the corporate drone (however youthful) over the free-spirited artist (however grizzled). Of Fremont’s landmark statue of Lenin, Chantry quotes the designer Frank Zepponi as suggesting that someone should “put a cash machine in its butt” to comment on this transmutation of neighbourhood values. Not that Seattle, the home of defense giant Boeing, ever lacked for traditionalists. But Chantry judged it an ominous blow to the underground when local conservatives, after years of trying, finally curtailed the display of street posters in 1994, on the unconvincing pretext that they were dangerous to workers climbing utility poles, and thereby cut off an important advertising medium for small theatres and clubs.

Lasky, J., Jacobs, K., 2001. Some People Can’t Surf: The Graphic Design of Art Chantry. San Francisco: Chronicle Books. (p. 18)

Photo 1 Feb 3 notes 
We took all the paper and we threw it on the ground in the silk-screen shop. Then we took it out and threw it onto the street and let cars run over it. Then we silk-screened onto it.

Lasky, J., Jacobs, K., 2001. Some People Can&#8217;t Surf: The Graphic Design of Art Chantry. San Francisco: Chronicle Books. (p. 15)
Poster reference: Chantry, A., 1995. Poster for Urban Outfitters.

We took all the paper and we threw it on the ground in the silk-screen shop. Then we took it out and threw it onto the street and let cars run over it. Then we silk-screened onto it.

Lasky, J., Jacobs, K., 2001. Some People Can’t Surf: The Graphic Design of Art Chantry. San Francisco: Chronicle Books. (p. 15)

Poster reference: Chantry, A., 1995. Poster for Urban Outfitters.


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